Dissections

Biology students prepare to "open up" in class

Kettle+Moraine+High+Schoool+of+Health+Sciences+students+Spencer+Scherwinski+%28middle%2C+left%29+and+Adam+Crouse+%28right%29+examine+the+inside+of+a+knee+during+a+knee+dissection+at+the+school+on+Feb.+6.

Staff photo by Carol Spaeth-Baue

Kettle Moraine High Schoool of Health Sciences students Spencer Scherwinski (middle, left) and Adam Crouse (right) examine the inside of a knee during a knee dissection at the school on Feb. 6.

Dissection is optional according to the Ohio Department of Education. Some schools choose to be a part in this educational activity while others don’t. Medina High School’s biology program will be soon including dissection in the class room.

The biology classes are going to dissect frogs, sharks, and pigs for two to three weeks.

According to biology teacher Laura Frawley students are required to follow the safety guidelines.

“Students are informed of all safety guidelines and sign a safety guideline form before starting dissection,” stated Frawley.

“I think it is very educational,” stated Frawley. “I like that it is hands-on and students can participate, learn and have fun all at the same time.”

When Frawley is about to order specimens, she takes many things into consideration.

“There are multiple choices of animals to select,” said Frawley. “ I try to select a variety that is educational but also interesting.”

“I order the specimens from the Nasco catalog,”  Frawley stated. “I count the number of students and determine the specimen amount based on those numbers. Animals are donated to science for dissection purposes.”

Frawley looks forward to the dissection unit. “I’m excited for the students to show what they have learned this year and participate in dissection. It is usually one of my favorites of what we do throughout the year. “

Frawley offers a computerized interactive dissection that can be in place of the dissection points.

“I would probably do that instead because the thought of it really grosses me out,” said Sophomore Izzy Neranndzic.

Others are excited and think the actual dissection will be a fun and educational experience.

“I think it’s interesting to be able to see all the organs,” said Sophomore Kaitlyn Sedorenko.